Greene Naftali Gallery, New York is pleased to present a group exhibition on the invitation of Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris. The exhibition brings together the work of longstanding, critically acclaimed gallery artists Rachel Harrison, Jacqueline Humphries, Monika Baer, Gedi Sibony, and Josef Strau, with the new painting positions of Jana Euler, Walter Price, and Andy Robert.


The title Arrangement in Gray—taken from the Rachel Harrison sculpture included in the exhibition, which in turn follows from the well-known James Abbott McNeill Whistler painting Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1 (Portrait of the Artist's Mother) (1871) held in the collection of the Musée d'Orsay—points to an engagement with painting and its myriad forms and histories, and explores the possibility of where art can sit in uncertain times.

, Arrangement In Gray, 2020

Rachel Harrison
Arrangement In Gray
2020
Wood, acrylic, cement, enamel, wig, and metal folding chair
160 x 47 x 53.3 cm | 63 x 18 1/2 x 21 inches

Price: 175,000 USD excl. VAT

Rachel Harrison



Rachel Harrison’s Arrangement in Gray, 2020, is titled after the well-known James Abbott McNeill Whistler painting, Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1 (Whistler’s Mother), 1871, held in the collection of the Musée d’Orsay. Less a take on portraiture and more an argument for the power of arrangement, this sculpture speaks to histories of still life, an art form that produces meaning through highly coded syntax and celebrates exciting and varied materiality.

Much like a still life, each component of Arrangement in Gray presents its own individuality of color and texture. Part of this sculptural composition––the cement-covered, highly textured, vividly painted form with almost-symmetrical grooves and a silver wig hanging down one side, positioned on a gray folding chair––reveals traces of the artist’s hand and tools through marks ever-changing in kind and direction.

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Andy Robert


Andy Robert constructs narrative in his work through a distinct intertwining of individual and shared histories that cross boundaries of time and culture. By following dynamic thought processes and threads of associations, he locates interconnected relationships among disparate themes and subjects, addressing social concerns through a transhistorical lens while maintaining the poeticism of multiplicity and ambiguity. In this new painting, Robert embraces a new level of abstraction and an increasingly philosophical perspective.

Mid Atlantic (2020) meditates on a moment of “becoming,” that fleeting space of thought and existence where one is caught in the middle; moving, but not towards something or someone. “Thinking without a project,” Robert says. A moment of “nakedness.” Robert’s frenzied, dynamic markings project this building potential across the canvas, continuously emerging with no distinct origin or ending. The palette, which simultaneously holds an ominous darkness, hopeful pastels, electric yellow and blue, embodies possibility, hovering between subject and object, consciousness and pre-consciousness, freedom and captivity.

The Atlantic conjures thoughts of refugees, migrants, storms, whalers, middle passage, and pirates, but it’s equally a reference to a vast place in the mind. Robert refers to this painting as a “a freeze,” caught in doubt—a questioning of night and day; speaking to a burgeoning concern for our need for identification, for clarity, for projects, and how the object of that need is too often a critical component of our sense of self—of being.

,   Mid Atlantic, 2020

Andy Robert
Mid Atlantic
2020
Oil, acrylic, charcoal, pastel, pencil, gesso and mixed media on canvas
243.8 x 203.2 x 5.1 cm | 96 x 80 x 2 inches213.4 x 203.2 x 5.1 cm | 84 x 80 x 2 inches30.5 x 203.2 x 5.1 cm | 12 x 80 x 2 inches

Price: 90,000 USD excl. VAT

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, To love, to hate, to infer, 2020

Walter Price
To love, to hate, to infer
2020
Acrylic, gesso and flashe paint on wood
101.6 x 101.6 cm | 40 x 40 inches

Walter Price


Walter Price’s paintings and drawings tread the line between figuration and abstraction, grounded in a visual vocabulary informed by both personal and shared experience. Fusing a wide range of references that simultaneously signal individual identities and trans-cultural realities of the human condition, as well as a deep understanding of art’s history, Price’s work presents an intense investigation of the limits and possibilities of (visual) knowledge. Partially realized objects and figures emerge from bustling negative space and bisecting planes of color, playing with specificity and narrative. A freedom of materials echoes this synthesis of the familiar and the out-of-place, while a continuously shifting gaze, with untold agents and objects, pressures the act of looking. Formal and figurative elements vie for one’s attention; a viewing experience that oscillates between recognition and confusion, knowing and not-knowing.
 
In To love, to hate, to infer (2020) Price places ambiguously connected figures and objects in an abstracted landscape, using these representational elements as agents of abstraction, impeding definitive figure-ground relationships. The dark flag––both rising and lowering––is of Price’s imagination, based off of sun flags, which represent hopefulness. This symbol of hope juxtaposes the otherwise perplexing, perhaps even bleak, scene, an attitude evident in the facial expressions of the figures in the foreground as well as the muted colors of the landscape. The stacked blocks of color almost recall Mark Rothko’s signature, transcendental paintings, but here the pigments are less brilliant, the vision inseparable from elements of our worldly lives, marked most pointedly by the toilet in the middle of the canvas––an ideogram for interiority.

None, "perseverance emoji, 2020

Jacqueline Humphries
😣
2020
Oil on linen
152.4 x 144.8 cm | 60 x 57 inches

Price: 225,000 USD excl. VAT

Jacqueline Humphries
 


Jacqueline Humphries’ painting practice is founded upon a poignant elaboration on the history of painting and its adaptation to new technologies. Since 2014, Humphries has adopted communicative icons––emojis and emoticons––as a self-reflective meditation on internet language and contemporary customs continuously unfolding in digital and screen culture.

In perseverance emoji (2020) Humphries originates a new painting technique, using a handheld, portable inkjet printer, to create an image of an emoji, which is then enlarged and cut into a stencil. As in her ASCII paintings, Humphries pushes paint through the stencil onto an already primed canvas built with continuously shifting marks of the artist’s hand. This newly designed process produces a heavily degraded emoji. A

lmost indecipherable, the image sits within a building tension across the canvas between larger shapes and the meticulous detail of the grid. Humphries demands of her viewer persistent looking and prolonged attention to exhume the ever-emerging emojis––a grinning cowboy at the bottom left; a cat silhouette at the middle-right edge; the mass of somewhat haunting faces floating above; and, lastly, the pink impasto perseverance emoji in the foreground, the largest and most degraded of them all, from which the work takes its title.

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Josef Strau  


Josef Strau’s practice centers on an exploration of representation and subjectivity in writing and artmaking. Described as both an artist who writes and a writer who makes art, Strau views the written word and art object as two inextricably linked domains. In this body of work, Strau manipulates his tin-covered canvases through deliberate erosions and incisions, inspired by the spiritually resonant gilt surfaces of Mexican and Byzantine objects.

Much like these objects of inspiration, which were often paired with forms of religious scripture, Strau creates his tin-and-wire works alongside automatic writings infused with memories and autobiography. With Inexperience and Divisiveness (both 2018), Strau incorporates these more personal elements in the works themselves, the violet and brown palettes referencing painter Friedensreich Hundertwasser (1928 – 2000), one of his childhood idols.

Inexperience, 2018

Josef Strau
Inexperience
2018
Tin plate, tin wire, acrylic on canvas
61.6 x 46.4 x 1.9 cm | 24 1/4 x 18 2/8 x 3/4 inches

Price: 15,000 USD excl. VAT

, Divisiveness, 2018

Josef Strau
Divisiveness
2018
Tin plate, tin wire, acrylic on canvas
40.6 x 30.5 x 2.5 cm | 16 x 12 x 1 inches

Price: 11,000 USD excl. VAT

Monika Baer  



Monika Baer has consistently negotiated painting’s place in our contemporary moment through careful consideration of form and content. Often deemed both conceptual and performative, her work simultaneously exhibits the highest realism and the purest abstraction. Referencing art histories of still life and monochrome, Baer suspends in abstract fields recognizable, ordinary objects rendered in paint with staggering accuracy or incorporated as assemblage objects.

In Untitled (2018) and In Reserve (2) (2019) metal fixtures that secure the paintings to the gallery walls continue Baer’s rupture of the monochromatic field, introducing a trace of human life with their familiar materiality. While a deeply introspective and ghostly sensuous vitality emerges from the grooves, traces, and material build-up that form subtle reliefs on their surfaces, the metal fixtures tether that presence, questioning the supposed autonomy of art objects.

, Untitled, 2018

Monika Baer
Untitled
2018
Acrylic and quartz on canvas, aluminum
50 x 40 cm | 19 5/8 x 15 3/4 inches

Price: 20,000 EUR excl. VAT

, Untitled, None

Monika Baer
In Reserve (2)
2019
Acrylic and quartz on canvas, aluminum
180 x 103 cm | 70 7/8 x 40 1/2 inches

Price: 55,000 EUR excl. VAT

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Gedi Sibony



"As we consider the gallery space from left to right and back again, we oscillate between graveyard and factory, between ruin and repair. Sibony’s work exists in an autonomous ecosystem with its own rules of life, death, and regeneration. Material traces of this elliptical process are suggested by the vanishing act staged in Still Life With Missing Elements and Cosmogram. Here, what looks like a banana (in the former) and a red ball (in the latter) have been excised from the two-dimensional surfaces of their respective paintings only to be rediscovered in the round, resting on tables in the right aisle of the gallery: the artist’s proverbial workshop. Sibony presents us with a pictorial and sculptural system whose internally regulated life cycle suggests that the artist’s interest lies in the ability of objects to operate independently. Sibony, it seems, started the engine and walked away."

–– Blake Oetting, "Gedi Sibony: The Terrace Theater" in The Brooklyn Rail (October 2020).

, Title TBC, 2019

Gedi Sibony
The Coupling Agent
2018-2019
Wood, screws, paint
236.2 x 55.9 x 40.6 cm | 93 x 22 x 16 inches

Price: 75,000 USD excl. VAT

, International Dance, 2020

Jana Euler
International Dance
2020
Oil on canvas
120 x 100 cm | 47 2/8 x 39 3/8 inches

Jana Euler
 


Jana Euler’s intelligent humor dissects mechanisms of power and virility through a wide range of references, from art history and critical theory to pop culture and daily life. Each corner of International Dance (2020) depicts partners engaged in activity of varying ease and elegance. To the left, choreographed steps and costumes invoke the flair of Flamenco and Salsa, among other Latin dance traditions, while the frame’s upper right corner stages the Waltz, a ballroom style of German invention popularized in Austria. Finally, a scene of outlying ferocity unfolds in the bottom right––a lioness sinking her teeth into the throat of a wild goat.

Confining these dramatic actions to the composition’s corners and, in some places, cutting off the figures with the edges of the canvas, Euler constructs a sense of simultaneous vastness and claustrophobia. With versatile technique that draws from hyper-realist, figurative, abstract, and surrealist styles, Euler’s painting positions itself in contemporary discourse, prompting audiences to become aware of their own physical and social space.

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Galerie Chantal Crousel thanks Greene Naftali Gallery for its close collaboration on making this Online Viewing Room.

 

For more information, please contact sales@crousel.com

or call +33 1 42 77 38 87.

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