Jean-Luc Moulène
Implicites & Objets
October 22 - December 19, 2020

 

For his sixth exhibition at Galerie Chantal Crousel, Jean-Luc Moulène takes us through a sculptural landscape where abstraction manifests itself as a force of thought and imagination, intertwined with still, bold figuration on a ritualized stage.

In the first room, the abstract object Montagne pourpre (2019) is put up upon its base.

The fruit of 3D modeling turned out on machine-tools, this impressive hard-foam sculpture is a surface with body. Designed by the artist, it is a three-dimensional monochrome.

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Jean-Luc Moulène
Montagne pourpre
2019
Paint and resin on hard foam - Manufacturing Créaform, Vierzon
80 x 115 x 93 cm | 31 1/2 x 45 2/8 x 36 5/8 inches

Price: 180,000 EUR excl. VAT

Grouped around the Montagne pourpre and back against the wall, a new ensemble of hand-crafted concrete sculptures entitled Implicites watch from afar but, observers, they witness and see their own interiority. Resulting from the same production protocol as the Tronches series (2014-2017), the figures are upside-down and inside-out, interiorized then filled with concrete – effigies with distorted faces and bodies.

 The concrete appears different from one sculpture to the next in terms of color (tones of grey) as much as surface (wax or epoxy). The bodies’ shapes and attributes burst out from their own erasing by the act of filling. This, in a sense, is a staging of sensitive existence.

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Jean-Luc Moulène
Jeune Homme
2020
Waxed reinforced concrete
155 x 83 x 44 cm | 61 x 32 5/8 x 17 3/8 inches

Price: 115,000 EUR excl. VAT

Jean-Luc Moulène, Oscar, 2020

Jean-Luc Moulène
Oscar
2020
Waxed reinforced concrete
128 x 50 x 40 cm | 50 3/8 x 19 5/8 x 15 3/4 inches

Price: 115,000 EUR excl. VAT

Jean-Luc Moulène, Grande, 2020

Jean-Luc Moulène
Grande
2020
Waxed reinforced concrete
166 x 45 x 46 cm | 65 3/8 x 17 6/8 x 18 1/8 inches

Price: 130,000 EUR excl. VAT

Jean-Luc Moulène, Marie, 2020

Jean-Luc Moulène
Marie
2020
Waxed reinforced concrete
176 x 36 x 26 cm | 69 2/8 x 14 1/8 x 10 2/8 inches

Price: 130,000 EUR excl. VAT

 They are either full latex or silicole bodies, which the artist turned inside out, poured concrete into and reinforced with threaded shaft. Once dry, the synthetic materials are removed and the concrete waxed or covered by epoxy resin.

In the the very center of the second room, we can find Pyramid’os (2020) — a totem sculpture in bronze on the high pedestal.

The human body, its organs and its limbs constitute a lexical repertoire on which many tongues have drawn has drawn to form many picturesque expressions. From Leonardo da Vinci to Corbusier, the human body has also served as a reference, as a measure. It can be its own standard or part of geometry, or even serve as a unit in a space structured by its proportions.

Echoing this history and these uses, Jean-Luc Moulène has constructed a pyramid with the long bones of the four human limbs. The leg bones–femurs, tibiae and fibulae–join the arm bones–humeri, radii et ulnae–in the pyramid’s skeleton. Thus each of the four joints at the figure’s four vertices–elbows and knees–suffers a dismemberment to follow the laws of geometry.

The form erected by Moulène is empty in its heart. This absence reveals the margins to which the lower and upper limbs have been relayed, leaving to the heart, the lungs and the brain their dominant function. The artist defines his pieces as documentary sculptures. This composition bears witness to the representations that constitute our bodies.

— Balthazar Lovay

Jean-Luc Moulène, Pyramid'os, 2020

Jean-Luc Moulène
Pyramid'os
2020
Bronze, vertdigris patina - Fonderie de Coubertin
Approx. 54 x 77 x 65 cm | 21 2/8 x 30 3/8 x 25 5/8 inches
Edition 2/3 + 2 AP
Price: 80,000 EUR excl. VAT

Jean-Luc Moulène, Tronche, 2020

Jean-Luc Moulène
Tronche
2020
Graphite on paper
62.5 x 53.5 x 2.5 cm | 24 5/8 x 21 1/8 x 1 inches (framed)

Price: 9,000 EUR excl. VAT

The drawings and collages […] take us into the creative backyard of a cultivated, mordant mind striving to comprehend the world it lives in without forgetting to have fun and entertain. Others serve to exorcise old demons that the artist pins down one and for all on paper.

— Michel Blancsubé

With this object, Jean-Luc Moulène plays on the axes of space with a column and its spiral. If the column is deflected, the spiral is continuous. Red speeds up the movement. The artist inserts a new sign that creates a different direction of the eye.

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Jean-Luc Moulène
Colonne Déviée
2019
Wood, oil paint
50 x 18 x 18 cm | 19 5/8 x 7 1/8 x 7 1/8 inches

Price: 40,000 EUR excl. VAT

Jean-Luc Moulène, 66, 2020

Jean-Luc Moulène
66
2020
Reinforced concrete, epoxy resin
65 x 27 x 15 cm | 25 5/8 x 10 5/8 x 5 7/8 inches

Price: 60,000 EUR excl. VAT

Reiterating the formal issues raised by Montagne pourpre, Montagne blanche (2020) has a ‘quelconque’ (ordinary) abstract shape - frequently used term in the artist’s lexicon to describe a shape, a thing of which we know neither the structure, composition nor transformation.

Montagne blanche is a large white monochrome still with traces of oil painting on its surface, each trace linking straight back to the visible gestures of the artist painting on canvas.

Also relief painting, Nature Morte (2020) is not a ‘quelconque’ shape but a volume with realistic, non-covert parts, bones and stones.

Jean-Luc Moulène, Nature Morte, 2020

Jean-Luc Moulène
Nature Morte
2020
Wood, canvas, porcelain, polystyrene, plastic, stones, shellac, coating, oil paint
41 x 75 x 49 cm | 16 1/8 x 29 1/2 x 19 2/8 inches

Price: 70,000 EUR excl. VAT

Jean-Luc Moulène, Montagne Blanche, 2020

Jean-Luc Moulène
Montagne blanche
2020
Wood, canvas, porcelain, polystyrene, coating, oil paint
45 x 75 x 53 cm | 17 6/8 x 29 1/2 x 20 7/8 inches

Price: 70,000 EUR excl. VAT

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Hundreds of nazar boncukları are spread over the top of Talisman (2020), small, traditional, Turkish glass amulets designed to protect against the evil eye — tipping the wink one could say at the ‘quelconque’ abstraction shown at the 2019 Venice Biennale (Pale blue Eyes, 2019) — which seem to proliferate and look around, eyeing as much the sculptures as the visitors.

Jean-Luc Moulène, Talisman, 2020

Jean-Luc Moulène
Talisman
2020
Stones and Nazar boncuk in epoxy resin
17 x 29 x 23 cm | 6 6/8 x 11 3/8 x 9 inches

Price: 35,000 EUR excl. VAT

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Photo: Pauline Assathiany

 Jean-Luc Moulène

Born in 1955, in Reims, France.
Lives and works in Saint-Langis-lès-Mortagne, France.

Drawings and sculptural objects have always played a part in his work, but both have assumed greater importance in recent years, superseding photography to become the chief component of Moulène’s most recent, large-scale exhibitions, though the essential spirit driving his distinctive œuvre remains unchanged. Moulène’s works explore the question of representation in his chosen media, while at the same time drawing on their essential physicality and materiality to engage tirelessly with political, social and ontological issues ‘made flesh’—notably through the concept of ‘transaction’, an economically and sensitively charged term applied to the ongoing transaction between the imagination and reality.

During these past two decades, Jean-Luc Moulène’s works have been presented in many great institutions and for important international events with for instance: the exhibitions More or Less Bone at SculptureCenter, New York, (2019) ; The Secession Knot at Secession, Vienna (2017); Jean-Luc Moulène at Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris (2016); Il était une fois at Villa Medici, Rome (2015); Documents and Opus (1985 - 2014) at Kunstverein in Hanover (2015); Jean-Luc Moulène . works at Beirut Art Center (2013); Jean-Luc Moulène at Modern Art Oxford, Oxford (2012); Opus + One, Dia:Beacon, Beacon, New York (2012); Jean-Luc Moulène at Carré d’art – Musée d’art contemporain in Nîmes (2010) or Le Monde – le Louvre at Musée du Louvre, Paris (2005); His participation to several biennales: 58th Venice Biennale (2019); Taipei Biennale, Taipei (2016); Biennale Internationale Design, Saint-Etienne (2015); Sharjah Biennale (2011) and at the Sao Paulo Biennale (2002).

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