Jean-Luc Moulène
12 mai - 23 juin 2007

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  • Jean-Luc Moulène, Exhibition view, Photo credits: Florian Kleinefenn, Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris
  • Jean-Luc Moulène, Exhibition view, Photo credits: Florian Kleinefenn, Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris
  • Jean-Luc Moulène, Exhibition view, Photo credits: Florian Kleinefenn, Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris
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The Chantal Crousel Gallery is proud to announce Jean-Luc Moulène’s new exhibition.

For that occasion, the artist will show 20 new works: 9 photographs, 4 drawings and 7 objects. No Pentagram as a drawing, La Main Noire – guardian of fears – as a photograph and Tête Noire as a molded object.

This exhibition is set where the darkness and shadow meet, between blackness and night, between various suns. Jean-Luc Moulène excavates the ways we represent and define a world within that blurry zone, between reality and apparition.
The works shown at the Gallery focus on the elaboration of the form, color and scale, through “adornment”. In that way they create the conditions for a sensitive and reflexive approach.

The artist is more interested in modeling and systems than in beliefs. In that exhibition, he revives the multiple connections of our implicit, inscrutable and closed-up representations on a new mental and impersonal stage. Horizons are incompatible, perspectives are hallucinated and solutions are soluble.

Quelque Chose Généralisée is a spherical model, made of flat colored wooden pieces, that takes up the entire space of a room. The volume keeps the viewer from entering it any further. However, the eye can access, and glance indefinitely through that borromean structure. The Boule Fixe is a topographical plan of black cobblestones that echoes it in a hard and opaque way, while Cinq Concentrés Concentriques and Quelque Chose Noir et Ombre radiate, giving the exhibition space a structure made out of their mobile directive lines. Trois Standards reminds us of architecture. La Fontaine aux Amoureux and L’Echelle drag us into a whirl.

The prevailing circular tension among the works is echoed in the plural infinites of the exhibition space.